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The 30 best Canadian classical recordings ever

The 30 best Canadian classical recordings ever

septembre 4, 2014
National

"Written and compiled by Denise Ball, Michael Morreale, Matthew Parsons and Grant Rowledge.

What is the greatest Canadian classical recording ever made? CBC Radio 2's In Concert wants to take you on a tour of 30 of the best.

The list is as diverse as Canada is wide, with repertoire ranging from orchestral masterpieces to lesser-known piano gems, and from a Renaissance choral work to a uniquely Canadian composition by a living composer. Many of these recordings were vehicles that introduced Canada's finest performers to the world. Others may have sold fewer copies but capture an important performance, event or piece. They were released as far back as 1955 — Glenn Gould's career-launching first recording of Bach's Goldberg Variations — and include two recordings as recent as 2014..."

www.music.cbc.ca / Complete Article
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"Album: Chimera (Centrediscs, 1991)
Artists: Judy Loman, Orford String Quartet

Murray Schafer writes music that defies categorization. His works blend theatre and dance, ritual and magic. His epic pieces are often performed in outdoor settings — on lakes and in forests — and celebrate the mystery of the Canadian landscape. This is a more intimate undertaking, written in 1979 for the outstanding Toronto harpist Judy Loman. The Crown of Ariadne, which also features the original Orford String Quartet, remains grounded in mythology. Devilishly difficult for the harpist, it's full of vibrant percussive effects and stands as a rich testament to Schafer's — and Loman's — artistry. — DB"

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"Album: Glass Houses Revisited (Centrediscs, 2014)
Artist: Christina Petrowska Quilico

This recording is the result of an extended collaboration — and friendship — between the distinguished Canadian composer Ann Southam and her most devoted interpreter, pianist Christina Petrowska Quilico. Petrowska Quilico selected an assortment of pieces from Southam's 1981 Glass Houses series, then added her own spin with the composer's blessing. She describes them as "fiendishly difficult études" played at breakneck speed. Petrowska Quilico manages the technical demands with supreme virtuosity and creates a complex sound tapestry that pays personal tribute to one of Canada's most engaging musical figures. — DB"

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www.music.cbc.ca / Complete Article